Crafting

Basic Crafting Rules

Mechanically speaking, the rules for crafting vary slightly depending upon the material being produced. The products of crafting endeavours fall into five broad categories:

  • Armour – Using Craft: Armoursmithing to produce light armour, medium armour and heavy armour, or any other less common version of armour.
  • Artwork – Creating artwork requires use of one of the Artisan Skills to produce a physical product, such as a painting or sculpture.
  • Engineering – Using the Engineering Skill to design structures or large-scale devices such as siege engines.
  • Equipment – Using a variety of Craft Skills to produce any material not covered by one of the other entries on this list.
  • Weapons – Using the Craft: weapon Skill to produce any Weapon, be it bows, swords, axes, chain weapons and so on.

To craft an object, a character requires time and materials. The time required to craft any given item, and the TN required to create it, are based on the cost of the item in question, if the items cost could be converted from for example silver to gold then it must be done to calculate the time. All crafting skill rolls are cumulative rolls and the character is allowed one roll each time a Unit of Time passes. The item can’t be completed before at least one Time Unit has passed.

To craft an object first determine the material that comprises the majority of the item, be it iron, steel, magical or something else. Then calculate the total cost of the object. Converting it to a different coin if possible. Then consult the 1.1 Table to decide the Time Unites. The Time Unites decide when a roll is allowed, be it each hour, once a day, once a week or once a month.

Now it’s time to figure out the Items Craft TN, consult table 1.2 and multiple the total cost of the object by the amount dictated by it’s coin. Now all that is required is to spend time crafting the object at a suitable location. The crafting will require the characters full attention and the Game Master can demand that the character calls a number of raises to catch up, if character spends to much time away. A Game master should even out right refuse a crafting roll if the character is barely working on it.

The following tables can be used to determine the time and difficulty of crafting an item based on its price

Units of Time required for crafting 1.1

Other Iron/Glass Steel Magic Materials
Copper Hours Days Days -
Silver Days Days Days Weeks
Gold Days Days Weeks Months
Coin
Crafting TN Multiplier 1.2
Copper Silver Gold
Cost * 10 = TN Cost * 5 = TN Cost * 30 = TN

NPC Craftsmen

If a Player wants to find a craftsman, he declares it to the Game Master that he’s looking for one and of what skill rank. The GM then rolls 1d100 and if he rolls equal to or below the percent chance on Table 1.3, then the player finds one of the relevant skill rank.

Table 1.3
Experience Skill Rank Chance of locating one
Beginner Rank: 1 95,00%
Novice Rank: 2 80,00%
Apprentice Rank: 3 65,00%
Journeyman Rank: 4 50,00%
Experienced Rank: 5 25,00%
Seasoned Rank: 6 20,00%
Senior Rank: 7 15,00%
Expert Rank: 8 10,00%
Master Rank: 9 5,00%
Grand Master Rank: 10 1,00%

Chance of locating a craftsman table also accounts for all forms of crafts, be it smiths, carpenters, stone workers, enchanters, scroll scriber’s, etc.

When a player has found a NPC to make an object for him, follow the normal rules for calculating the items Craft TN. But when the NPC craftsmen makes the item, they don’t actively rolls when a Time Unite passes, instead they simply progress an amount equal to 10 * the skill rank.

Example: A character has found a craftsman with a skill rank of 5 and commissions him to make him a Saber. After calculating the Sabers Craft TN which becomes 250 (The cost of the Saber, 50 Silver * 10 = 250). The Game Master can determine that it will take the craftsman five weeks to finish weapon (The craftsman’s Skill of 5 * 10 = 50 per Time unite.)

Craftsmen with an Skill Rank of 5 or higher usually have one or more Apprentices working along side them. The apprentices are allowed to add their skill * 5 to the object that their master is working on.

Example: The craftsman includes his Apprentice in the work of the Saber, then for the apprentice adds 15 towards the Sabers Craft TN each week. So each week the craftsman “rolls” 65 towards the craft TN. Reducing the time to make the saber with one week.

Magical materials can only be worked by craftsmen with a skill rank of 5 or higher.

Spell Rarity

If a character is looking for a spell he must consult table 1.4 too find out it’s rarity. Then he can roll on table 1.5 in order too see if he finds someone that can teach him or if there is a book with the desired spell.

1.4 Spell Mastery Level Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 Level 6 Level 7 – 8 Level 8 – 10
Rarity Uncommon Uncommon Scarce Scarce Rare Very Rare Legendary Unavailable

Availability table

Table 1.5 shows the chance of finding an item based on the location one is in and the Items Rarity.

1.5 Locations Abundant Plentiful Common Uncommon Scarce Rare Very Rare Legendary
Thorp 80% 60% 40% 20% 0% 0% 0% 0%
Hamlet 85% 65% 50% 30% 0% 0% 0% 0%
Village 90% 70% 60% 40% 0% 0% 0% 0%
Small Town 95% 90% 70% 50% 5% 1% 0% 0%
Large Town 100% 100% 80% 60% 10% 5% 1% 0%
Small City 100% 100% 90% 70% 20% 10% 3% 0%
Large City 100% 100% 100% 80% 40% 15% 5% 0%
Metropolis 100% 100% 100% 90% 50% 20% 10% 1%

Item Quality

All items come a variety of qualities, from a lump of iron called a sword forged by the hands of novices to alchemical sets crafted by the hands of a master. The quality of the item will affect it’s performance in a varied number of ways, from extra damage for weapons to reduced TN when using tools for crafting.

  • TN: The quality of the item makes it better or worse at it’s designated task, increasing or decreasing the TN of any roll that uses the item. This won’t effect armour, shields or weapons. Only tools such a smiths hammer, alchemical kits, thief’s tools and so on are effected.
  • DR: The better a weapons quality is, the more damage it will deal. The same is true in reverse. This effect shield too if they have shield spikes attached to them.
  • Armour TN: The quality of the armour or shield can increases or decreases its Armour TN.
  • Absorption Rating: The quality of the armour or shield can increases or decreases its Absorption Rating.
  • Break: The poorer the quality, the larger the chance the item will break under stress. Weapons, armour and shield are destroyed if they are dealt or deals the state amount of damage from a single attack. Other items break if the character using it fails a roll while using it and rolls a number of natural one’s equal to the stated amount.
    Craft TN: Once the Crafting TN has bin established, multiply it by the stated amount. This is the new crafting TN.
  • Cost: The better or worse the quality, the more cheap or expensive the item becomes. Multiply the cost of the item, do not include the increase in cost applied by materials or weapon extras, before calculating the Crafting TN. This is the new base cost for the item.
  • Experience: This determines the level of experience need to craft an item of that quality. Craftsmen with a higher level of experience can naturally craft objects of lesser quality.
  • Rarity: The quality of an item will also effect it’s availability, making it easier or far harder to find than normal. Use the highest rarity, Legendary being the highest, when looking for a item, regardless if its from the base item, its material or the quality.
Quality Level TN DR Armour TN AR Break Craft TN Cost Experience Rarity
Useless + 10 -1k0 -5 -4 20/1 * 0.3 * 0.1 Beginner Plentiful
Lousy + 5 -2 -3 -2 30/2 * 0.5 * 0.2 Novice & Apprentice Plentiful
Mediocre + 3 + 0 -1 -1 40/2 * 0.7 * 0.5 Apprentice Common
Normal +0 +0 +0 +0 - +0 *1 Journeyman Uncommon
Excellent - 3 + 0 +1 +0 - * 1.3 *2 Experienced & Seasoned Scarce
Brilliant - 5 +2 +2 +1 - * 1.5 *3 Senior & Expert Rare
Masterly - 10 +1k0 +4 +2 - * 2 *5 Master & Grand Master Very Rare

Item condition

Even the most outstanding item can over time fall to rust or rot. Daily maintenance is required for most items in order to keep them in good condition.

  • TN: The items condition makes it worse at its designated task, increasing the TN of any roll that uses the item. This won’t effect armour, shields or weapons. Only tools such a smiths hammer, alchemical kits, thief’s tools and so on are effected.
  • DR: The weapon has bin to rust, reducing it’s efficiency, reducing the DR of the weapon.
  • Armour TN / AR: The Condition of the armour or shield will decreases its Armour TN or Absorption Rating.
  • Break: The worse the condition the larger the chance of the item breaking while in use. Weapons, armour and shield are destroyed if they are dealt or deals the state amount of damage from a single attack. Other items break if the character using it fails a roll while using it and rolls a number of natural one’s equal to the stated amount.
  • Cost: The worse the quality is the cheaper an item becomes. Multiply the cost of the item, do not include the increase in cost applied by materials or weapon extras, before calculating the Crafting TN. This is the new base cost for the item.
Condition TN Penalty DR Penalty Armour TN Penalty AR Penalty Break Cost
Dilapidated +8 -1k1 -4 -3 10/1 * 0.1
Damaged +6 -0k1 -3 -2 20/2 * 0.2
Rusty +4 -1k0 -2 -1 40/2 * 0.5
Used +2 -2 -1 +0 50/3 * 0.8
Good +0 +0 +0 +0 +0 +0

Crafting

L5R High Fantasy Rule Rewrite Roke